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Medium Tree (5-12m)

Allocasuarina littoralis

Common Names: 
Black Sheoak

A densely foliaged small to medium tree. The foliage, like other Allocasuarina species, is made up of fine green branchlets with the leaves reduced to tiny scales.
The bark is finely furrowed and grey.
On male trees, an attractive feature is the flowers which consist of numerous rusty-brown anthers that coat the outer branchlets for several centimetres.

Acacia melanoxylon

Common Names: 
Blackwood

In the Victorian Volcanic Plains this species often grows as a bushy, small tree in exposed, windy areas but it grows much taller along creeklines. In mountainous areas, it may grow to be a tall forest tree. The dull green phyllodes; flattened leaf-like stems which replace the true leaves as the main photosynthetic structure, are short and may be covered with mealy scales.

Acacia implexa

Common Names: 
Lightwood

A slender, small tree, sometimes dense and rounded but generally with a light canopy. The light green phyllodes; flattened leaf-like stems which replace the true leaves as the main photosynthetic structure, are narrow and sickle-shaped (this species is frequently misidentified as a Eucalyptus because of this feature). Of the other indigenous wattles around Melbourne it is easily confused with Blackwood, Acacia melanoxylon. The Lightwood, is similar in almost all respects except that the phyllodes are usually darker and not sickle-shaped.

Lightwood pods small

Acacia mearnsii

Common Names: 
Black Wattle

A bushy medium tree, with a dark canopy. This is one of the Acacias with true leaves which are feathery or 'bipinnate'. Of the other indigenous wattles around Melbourne it is easily confused with Silver wattle, Acacia dealbata. Silver Wattle typically has a silvery or bluish hue to the leaves, is a vigorous,suckering tree found beside streams. The compound leaves of Silver wattle are narrower than Black wattle. Black wattle in contrast is a short-lived tree that does not sucker and typically occurs in drier parts of the landscape than Silver Wattle.

Acacia dealbata

Common Names: 
Silver Wattle

One of the two indigenous wattles in the Melbourne area with bipinnate (ferny) leaves. The leaves of Silver Wattle have a bluish colour compared to Black Wattle Acacia mearnsii. The Sydney Black Wattle (also known as the Early Black Wattle), Acacia decurrens also has bipinnate leaves but is not indigenous to the Melbourne area. It has frequently been planted as a native because of its intense bright yellow flowers and has become a weed in the Melbourne area.

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